Kobe biennale 2013


From: Aukje Dekker <aukjedekker@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, Feb 13, 2013 at 12:32 PM
Subject: Eddie the Eagle Museum: Art in a Container International Competition
To: kb_container@kobe-biennale.jp
Cc: contact@eddietheeaglemuseum.com



Dear Kobe

 

With pleasure the Eddie the Eagle Museum applies for participation of the KOBE International Container Biennial 2013.

Hereby we agreed on the consent (document attached).

 

Name, Adress, Phone Number:

 

Eddie the Eagle Museum 

Tolhuisweg 2  1031 CL Amsterdam

0031 (0) 6 23690884

contact@eddietheeaglemuseum.com

www.eddietheeaglemuseum.com

 

If there are any questions concerning the application, please contact us at contact@eddietheeaglemuseum.com and we will provide instant clarity.

 

 

Kind regards

 

The Eddie the Eagle Museum

contactperson: Aukje Dekker

 

 

 

Moving Memories

A project of Eddie the Eagle Museum (NL)

Some memories deserve to become eternal. With the project Moving Memories the Eddie the Eagle Museum anticipates the work of future historians who have to work though an overload of information in search of those things that will survive the test of time. How can we create a lasting, communal document in this highly volatile world? Art can be a means to get a hold on a personal present and create a sense of community through the common experience of memory. Eddie the Eagle museum collects objects and their stories, ‘encapsulating’ them in a container. The result is a shrine of subjective, heterogeneous personal history, put on display in a container that feels like a highly condensed mini-museum.

The creation of history is a continuous work in progress. This work should be a communal endeavor and not a top-down process of canonization. We want to give special attention to everything that is invisible, unsaid and unheard in this era, that is, things that are not going to be part of official history. That’s why we have built the time capsule as a moving house, a container with an open studio, workplace, archive and confessional. Eddie the Eagle sets up the framework and provides several media, like voice-recorders, camera’s, pencils, etc. The content, however, is assembled and made by the people that we meet and invite into the capsule. There, we ask the visitor to leave an object behind and to contextualize it with a personal history and/or memory.

Our inspirations are: the studio of Francis Bacon, the Museum of Broken Relationships, shrines and pilgrimage sites from all over the world, nomads and migratory movements, but most of all, living and moving memories.

 

PROPOSAL 1

Our first proposal is our most ambitious, but also our preferred option. We think it provides the best opportunity to create a direct connection between the Netherlands and Japan, as well as involve a large part of the world in this project that aims to build a sense of community through a hands-on living art-installation.

Before starting our journey to KOBE, we start collecting memories starts in our container at home, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Traveling overland through Europe, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, China and eventually Japan, we will gradually fill the container from the back to the front, and cover the inside as well as the outside with all kinds of memorabilia we pick up on our way, all items accompanied by their story. We expect this trip to take up one to two months, and plan to make a documentary of the trip from west to east. We think this is an excellent medium to engage the audience into the growth of the installation, as well as document the encounters and stories of the objects.

We ask people: what is your most sacred memory and what object symbolizes this? This question will be the common denominator of all the objects and stories we collect.

Our stay in Japan will provide the last layer of the container that has grown into an exuberant pastiche of materials, reflecting a large variety of cultures and communities. Our job is to create clarity and order in the chaos, by arranging the objects at hand. In Kobe, the container will not be a static exhibition, but an interactive installation where the (Japanese) visitor is invited to contribute to this journey of global memory. The visitor can see how his or her personal memory and object compare to and blend into material that other people from other cultures have left behind.

 

PROPOSAL 2

A second proposal is a bilateral collaboration between two countries. First we collect the objects and their accompanying memories in the Netherlands, and ship the container to Japan. We do not pick up memories during a journey, but collect in two specific places, the Netherlands and Japan. An option is that we open a hotline and postal address where people can send their contributions to, so we can still add mnemonic layers to the installation from all over the world. This channel will be a kind of ‘voicemail to the future’, where people can deposit their most sacred memories.

Once the container has arrived in Kobe, we will engage the visitors in providing the second influx of memories as described in Proposal 1. The result is that the container will mostly blend two layers: the Dutch and the Japanese. It will be interesting to see how these objects and stories compare, differ, clash, blend and coincide. The installation will be a commentary, reflection and even celebration of the collaboration between two countries. Far West and far East.

PROPOSAL 3

 

The third option is that we use a container that the KOBE biennale provides for. . We will bring the Dutch memories and their objects to Japan to create the installation on the spot in one of the KOBE containers. The focus will be mostly on the ‘shrine’ we erect in Japan, with all its objects and memories we collect throughout the country, arranging them onsite in the Kobe container. There we aim to work together with local communities to create the new layer; a lasting ‘document’ and ‘capsule’ of personal history by asking again: what is your most sacred memory?  An additional option would be to eventually bring these contributions back to the Netherlands and make the trip proposed in proposal 1. backwards, that is, from Japan to the Netherlands, from East to West. If this option is eligible we will keep you, the Kobe Biennale, very closely involved in this project of moving memories once it leaves Kobe.


PROPOSAL 1

Our first proposal is our most ambitious, but also our preferred option. We think it provides the best opportunity to create a direct connection between the Netherlands and Japan, as well as involve a large part of the world in this project that aims to build a sense of community through a hands-on living art-installation.

Before starting our journey to KOBE, we start collecting memories starts in our container at home, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Traveling overland through Europe, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, China and eventually Japan, we will gradually fill the container from the back to the front, and cover the inside as well as the outside with all kinds of memorabilia we pick up on our way, all items accompanied by their story. We expect this trip to take up one to two months, and plan to make a documentary of the trip from west to east. We think this is an excellent medium to engage the audience into the growth of the installation, as well as document the encounters and stories of the objects.

We ask people: what is your most sacred memory and what object symbolizes this? This question will be the common denominator of all the objects and stories we collect.

Our stay in Japan will provide the last layer of the container that has grown into an exuberant pastiche of materials, reflecting a large variety of cultures and communities. Our job is to create clarity and order in the chaos, by arranging the objects at hand. In Kobe, the container will not be a static exhibition, but an interactive installation where the (Japanese) visitor is invited to contribute to this journey of global memory. The visitor can see how his or her personal memory and object compare to and blend into material that other people from other cultures have left behind.

 

PROPOSAL 2

A second proposal is a bilateral collaboration between two countries. First we collect the objects and their accompanying memories in the Netherlands, and ship the container to Japan. We do not pick up memories during a journey, but collect in two specific places, the Netherlands and Japan. An option is that we open a hotline and postal address where people can send their contributions to, so we can still add mnemonic layers to the installation from all over the world. This channel will be a kind of ‘voicemail to the future’, where people can deposit their most sacred memories.

Once the container has arrived in Kobe, we will engage the visitors in providing the second influx of memories as described in Proposal 1. The result is that the container will mostly blend two layers: the Dutch and the Japanese. It will be interesting to see how these objects and stories compare, differ, clash, blend and coincide. The installation will be a commentary, reflection and even celebration of the collaboration between two countries. Far West and far East.

PROPOSAL 3

 

The third option is that we use a container that the KOBE biennale provides for. . We will bring the Dutch memories and their objects to Japan to create the installation on the spot in one of the KOBE containers. The focus will be mostly on the ‘shrine’ we erect in Japan, with all its objects and memories we collect throughout the country, arranging them onsite in the Kobe container. There we aim to work together with local communities to create the new layer; a lasting ‘document’ and ‘capsule’ of personal history by asking again: what is your most sacred memory?  An additional option would be to eventually bring these contributions back to the Netherlands and make the trip proposed in proposal 1. backwards, that is, from Japan to the Netherlands, from East to West. If this option is eligible we will keep you, the Kobe Biennale, very closely involved in this project of moving memories once it leaves Kobe.

PROPOSAL 3

 

The third option is that we use a container that the KOBE biennale provides for. . We will bring the Dutch memories and their objects to Japan to create the installation on the spot in one of the KOBE containers. The focus will be mostly on the ‘shrine’ we erect in Japan, with all its objects and memories we collect throughout the country, arranging them onsite in the Kobe container. There we aim to work together with local communities to create the new layer; a lasting ‘document’ and ‘capsule’ of personal history by asking again: what is your most sacred memory?  An additional option would be to eventually bring these contributions back to the Netherlands and make the trip proposed in proposal 1. backwards, that is, from Japan to the Netherlands, from East to West. If this option is eligible we will keep you, the Kobe Biennale, very closely involved in this project of moving memories once it leaves Kobe.